Carol Ann Sayle & Larry Butler, Farmers & Owners / Boggy Creek Farm

Nestled in the heart of East Austin, the five acres of Boggy Creek Farm represent one of the most veteran urban farms in the whole country, let alone in Austin. The house on the lot was built in 1840 along with its sister house, The French Legation Museum, which is close by. Both houses were built in 1841 and Carolann stresses the fact that they have to not only take care of their five acres of farmland but also the house itself. 

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

Carol Ann Sayle and Larry Butler started their original farm in 1991, about 80 miles away in the Oak Hill area. At the time, Carolann had an art studio right next to Larry's television store. Their landlord introduced the two, they formed a friendship, and found themselves combining their families. Larry's family grew up on 40 acres of farmland in the area, so he knew a thing or two about farming before Boggy Creek. They always loved East Austin and found themselves buying their East Austin land in 1992 so they could farm in town. The grand greenhouse contains the seeds that end up being planted in the field, as Carol Ann stresses that everything on the farm is started at seed right there. From tomatoes and cauliflower to Romanesco and everything in between, all of the produce is lovingly cared for by the Sayle/Butler Family and their small team.

photo credit: irvianne torremoro 

photo credit: irvianne torremoro 

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

Since there weren’t any farm stands in the area, they started their own on their property in 1994, with just one table of produce until the word spread. Nowadays, Boggy Creek Farm stand has expanded from that first table to a larger spot next to the house. Boggy Creek’s weekly produce is represented, along with goods from other local purveyors like Pure Luck Farm, Bee Tree Farm, Dos Lunas and Thunder Heart Bison. Also on the shelves are Larry’s Original Smoked Dried Tomatoes and Hot Sauce, both delicious snacks from the man himself. The farm stand is open from Wednesday to Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

Dorsey Barger & Susan Hausmann, Owners / HausBar Urban Farm

“The driving principle here is insane levels of sustainability,” Dorsey Barger says of HausBar Farms.

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

A gem hidden off the beaten path in East Austin, Dorsey and her wife Susan Hausmann found the two acres of land in 2009 that would be their beloved farm and garden. Barger owned East Side Cafe for twenty years before realizing she needed a different challenge. The pair turned a lot full of junk into a paradise with a plethora of vegetables, animals, and the ethos of sustainability at its core.  

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

Dorsey stresses that everything is completely pesticide and gas-free, all fifty-one vegetable beds were dug by hand and taken care of with as much care for the environment and local community as possible. When you hear Dorsey speak about the farm, you can tell how much she cares about every single millimeter of the farm, from the okra, marigold, bananas (yes, Texas grown bananas!), and her brood of animals (make sure to say hi to Gustavo the Gus for some kisses and his personal tour of the farm).

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

HausBar works directly with restaurants to up the ante on their seasonal menus. Drop the the name to any local chef and they’ll know who you’re talking about, singing the praises of this urban farm. Dorsey has credited “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” by Michael Pollan as a major inspiration for the open educational tours they provide. The science behind upholding HausBar is fascinating and she's more than willing to further explain the ecosystems that make the farm what it is today.

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro

photo credit: irvianne torremoro